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Diposting oleh On 01.18

Power-starved Nigeria on the brink after six plants closed

File: Swathes of Africa's most populous nation of 180 million plunged into darkness on Saturday night during a World Cup match between Nigeria and Croatia. Photo: Pixabay

ABUJA - Nigerian officials were working on Monday to prevent the "collapse" of the electric grid after they had to close down six power plants following a pipeline failure and "technical issues" at Shell gas wells.

Swathes of Africa's most populous nation of 180 million plunged into darkness on Saturday night during a World Cup match between Nigeria and Croatia.

"Six thermal power generating stations are currently unable to generate electricity and have therefore been shut down," the Transmission Company of Nigeria (TCN) said in a statement.

"With a total loss of 1,087 Megawatts into the grid, the transmission system has become quite fragile and the TCN is working hard to avert a collapse of the system by engaging in load shedding."

Electricity production has oscillated between 2,500 megawatts and 4,500 megawatts out of capacity of 7,000 megawatts. South Africa, which has a third of Nigeria's population, produces 45,000 megawatts.

Lack of public lighting in some parts of the country created a fertile breeding ground for crime, pushing some citizens to take matters into their own hands.

Reversing the country's crippling power deficit is seen as key to driving economic growth but has evaded successive governments because of mismanagement, incompetence and vested interests.

AFP

Source: Google Nigeria | Netizen 24 Nigeria

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Diposting oleh On 01.18

Stranded Nigeria fans struggle to leave Kaliningrad in time for crucial Iceland match

Russia

About 100 Nigerian soccer fans stranded in Kaliningrad following their team’s loss to Croatia in their World Cup opener were finally on the move on Monday after what was described as a visa gaffe.

Most of the supporters had planned to take the train from Kaliningrad back to Moscow following the Super Eagles 2-0 loss on Saturday but did not have the necessary visas to pass through countries like Lithuania and Latvia.

Russian officials stepped in to help the marooned fans by arranging flights but they were not free.

Full support has been given to the Nigerian supporters who despite multiple warnings from FIFA and information alerts from the consulate, were not able to travel from Kaliningrad to Moscow on June 16.

Nigerian fans cry foul over ‘expensive’ flights

Supporters said they were told flights would be found at the lowest possible fare but one fan told Reuters he was quoted a price of 28,000 Rubles ($442) which he declined to pay.

Eventually, he arranged a ticket for 6,000 Rubles ($95) but would not be able to leave Kaliningrad until Monday evening.

“I was not going to pay that for a flight that is one hour,” Babajide Oke, a Nigerian who lives and works in Atlanta, told Reuters as he stretched out on a row of seats in the concourse while other supporters in their national jerseys wandered about. “I go t on my laptop and found my own ticket.

“When I got to the train station they gave us the wrong information and they told us we should go to the airport and we can purchase tickets at a discounted rate,” he said.

Many of those sitting around Oke said they had tickets but would not be able to leave until Tuesday evening.

Role of Russian authorities

TASS News Agency, citing Andrei Yermak, Kaliningrad’s minister for culture and tourism, reported around 80 Nigerians were unable to leave by train.

“Full support has been given to the Nigerian supporters who despite multiple warnings from FIFA and information alerts from the consulate, were not able to travel from Kaliningrad to Moscow on June 16,” Kaliningrad government press services said in a statement.

“A large number of the Nigerians flew to the capital on June 18. Around 20 people already have plane tickets for the 19th.”

ALSO READ: Russia bans ‘luc ky’ chickens as Nigeria’s coach says team is ‘physically and mentally ready’

Nigeria’s World Cup fortunes

Meanwhile, the Nigeria coach has said all hope is not lost ahead of his side’s Group D clash against Iceland.

Gernot Rohr, who said his youthful side will learn from mistakes that saw them concede twice from set pieces ‘can do better’.

“We have to accept this defeat and now we have to win against Iceland, all is possible still,” said Rohr.

“When you lose a match it is something we don’t like but we recognise that Croatia had the better team tonight and my young players made some mistakes,” he added.

Nigeria has an uphill task of qualifying from the group considering that they meet a solidly organised Iceland side that held two time world champions Argentina to a 1-1 draw in the opening game.

Source: Google Nigeria | Netizen 24 Nigeria

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Diposting oleh On 01.18

Croatia Tops Nigeria to Take Control of Group D

  1. Croatia Tops Nigeria to Take Control of Group D New York Times
  2. Croatia vs. Nigeria final score: Own goal, penalty kick from Modric lifts Europeans into first in Group D CBSSports.com
  3. World Cup 2018: Nigeria loses to Croatia 2-0, but Nigerian fans remain hopeful africanews
  4. Croatia vs Nigeria: Live blog, text commentary, line-ups, stream & TV channel Goal.com (blog)
  5. Full coverage
Source: Google Nigeria | Netizen 24 Nigeria

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Diposting oleh On 01.18

Nigeria Security Tracker Weekly Update: June 9â€"June 15

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Nigeria

Boko Haram

Cameroon

Terrorism and Counterterrorism

Sub-Saharan Africa

Below is a visualization and description of some of the most significant incidents of political violence in Nigeria from June 9 to June 15, 2018. This update also represents violence related to Boko Haram in Cameroon, Chad, and Niger. These incidents will be included in the Nigeria Security Tracker.

Weekly Incident Map Dashboard
  • June 9: A suicide bomber killed himself but no others in Maiduguri, Borno. Boko Haram was suspected.
  • June 9: Thirteen were killed in a clash between bandits and vigilantes in Isa, Sokoto.
  • June 9: Her dsmen killed two in Bassa, Plateau.
  • June 11: A suicide bomber killed himself and two others in Maiduguri, Borno. Boko Haram was suspected.
  • June 11: Boko Haram attacked Madagali, Adamawa; Nigerian forces fought them back, killing one Boko Haram militant.
  • June 11: Nigerian and Cameroonian soldiers killed twenty-three Boko Haram militants in Kukawa, Borno (LGA estimated).
  • June 12: Herdsmen killed one in Obi, Nasarawa.
  • June 12: Herdsmen killed four in Logo, Benue.
  • June 12: Herdsmen killed one in Logo, Benue.
  • June 13: Bandits killed twenty-six in Birnin Magaji, Zamfara.
  • June 13: Herdsmen killed four in Keana, Nasarawa.
  • June 13: Nigerian police killed three kidnappers in Bali, Taraba.
  • June 14: Nigerian troops killed "some" (estimated at five) bandits in Benue (LGA unknown).
  • June 15: Nigerian Air Force aircraft killed "some" (estimated at five) Boko Haram mili tants in Gwoza, Borno.

More on:

Nigeria

Boko Haram

Cameroon

Terrorism and Counterterrorism

Sub-Saharan Africa

UpSource: Google Nigeria | Netizen 24 Nigeria

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Diposting oleh On 02.30

The cattle conflict pushing Nigeria to edge of a religious civil war

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Nairobi: In the fertile grasslands of central Nigeria, the roar of a motorcycle is enough to instill fear in the Christian cattle herders stalked by an increasingly bloody conflict. The rev of an engine is the first sign that gangs of kidnappers have emerged from the forest for their latest sortie in a battle over diminishing farmland that appears to be drawn along sectarian lines.

Across Africa's most populous country, an undeclared war, triggered in part by climate change and fought over cattle, has turned Muslims and Christians against each other in a confrontation so bitter it threatens to tear Nigeria apart.

A herdsboy leads animals to feed in the bush in Lafia capital of Nasarawa state, north-central Nigeria.

Photo: AFP

Fights over cattle have claimed thousands of lives in Sou th Sudan and the Central African Republic, two states devastated by civil war. Militias raised by armed cattle herders have brought anarchy to parts of northern Kenya, killing farmers white and black.

But nowhere are the consequences more potentially dangerous than in Nigeria, Africa's richest and arguably most important country. Hundreds of thousands have fled their homes, while farms and villages in many states have been abandoned, raising fears of hunger, economic collapse and spread of disease in camps for the displaced.

The perceived aggressors are mostly semi-nomadic cattle herders from the Fulani, an ethnic group numbering 20 million people with territory across west and central Africa.

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Nigerian Fulani, who are mostly Muslim, have traditionally pastured their cattle mostly in the north of the country. However, in some northern states, up to 75 per cent of grassland has been swallowed up by desert. More frequent droughts, the disappearance o f water sources and attacks by Boko Haram have combined to drive the Fulani and their herds into Nigeria's fertile central farmlands, the so-called Middle Belt - where much of the population is Christian.

Children pray as Christian community members take part in a protest against the killing of people by suspected herdsmen in Makurdi, north-central Nigeria in April.

Photo: AFP

Attempts by officials and farmers to protect their crops and husbandry have led to gruesome reprisals. Farmers tending crops have returned to their villages, their severed hands stuffed into their pockets, in attacks meant to terrify others into abandoning their fields. Villages have also come under attack by suspected Fulani gangs on motorcycles. Last month, 71 people were killed in a village in Kaduna state when gangs opened fire on its fleeing inhabitants, before setting fire to homes and hacking children to death.

Not all the atta cks have been on Christians, with some Fulani killed by fellow tribesmen. At least 20 people were killed in an attack on a village in the mostly Muslim state of Zamfara.

Nor are all the attacks carried out by Fulanis with cows. Fulani youths believed to have lost their herds have set up kidnapping camps in the vast Rugu forest, from where they emerge on motorcycles to prey on pedestrians walking along isolated roads. At least 100 people were kidnapped in a two-day spree in Kaduna state last month, according to local officials.

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The conflict is increasingly being perceived as one between Muslims and Christians, a view reinforced by an attack on a church in Benue state in April when two priests and 17 of their congregation were killed as they said Mass. The attack persuaded many of Nigeria's Christians that the Fulanis' real intent is dispossession, territorial acquisition and the expansion of Islam - all to be achieved by the ethnic cleansing of Christians .

"The reverend fathers were not farmers," said Samuel Ortom, Benue State's Christian governor. "The armed herdsmen have moved the narrative of the current crisis from search for grass to other obvious motives."

Christian tribesmen have formed armed vigilante groups to take on the herders when they attack - and to carry out reprisal attacks. In one recent moment of vengeance, Fulanis say 50 of their members, including children, were slaughtered.

Prominent Christians have accused NIgerian President Muhammadu Buhari of turning a blind eye to the attacks because he is a Fulani Muslim.

"Nigerians in their thousands have been gruesomely dispatched to the Great Beyond by armed Fulani herdsmen who are being protected by the powers that be," said Emmanuel Onwukibo, the coordinator of the Christian-dominated Human Rights Writers' Association of Nigeria. There is no evidence to suggest Buhari is siding with the herders, whose rep resentatives insist they are as much victims as the Christian farmers.

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The President has ordered the army to restore order, but so stretched are the armed forces and so well armed their opponents that a military response is unlikely to work. Instead, experts say, peaceful resolution is the only answer.

Under British rule, migration routes and grazing zones were set aside for the Fulani herds but these have disappeared through a mixture of corrupt land allocation and a soaring population of sedentary farmers in the Middle Belt. Opening them up is crucial, the experts maintain.

John Onaiyekan, the Catholic archbishop of Abuja, Nigeria's capital has warned that Buhari is running out of time to take action that will convince Christians that there is not a "grand mischievous plan for territorial conquest, ethnic cleansing and religious imposition" by the Fulanis. "The very survival of our nation is now at stake," he said.

Te legraph, London

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Source: Google Nigeria | Netizen 24 Nigeria

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Diposting oleh On 17.22

Blast kills 31 people in northeast Nigerian state of Borno

MAIDUGURI - A blast killed at least 31 people in the northeast Nigerian state of Borno, two residents said on Sunday.
They said the blast occurred in the Damboa local government area in the south of the state, which is at the epicenter of an Islamist militant insurgency, on Saturday around 8:30 p.m. local time.


Source: Google Nigeria | Netizen 24 Nigeria